Have you had the chance to taste the wonders of Maison Bollinger champagnes? Whatever your answer, you should know that behind this vineyard lies an untold story that deserves to be told. In the...Lire la suite

There are 2 products.

Showing 1-2 of 2 item(s)

Have you had the chance to taste the wonders of Maison Bollinger champagnes? Whatever your answer, you should know that behind this vineyard lies an untold story that deserves to be told. In the 19th century, when aristocrats were not allowed to trade, Athanase de Villermont inherited a large estate in the Aÿ region. He later met Joseph Bollinger and Paul Renaudin. The former was interested in the wine trade, the latter in wine-making. The two founded Renaudin-Bollinger & Cie. Maison Bollinger was then passed down from father to son through the marriage of Joseph B. and Louise-Charlotte, daughter of Athanase. It was not until 2008, however, that Jérôme Philipon, a "family outsider", took over the presidency. Claude d'Hautefeuille led a number of reforms that helped modernize production techniques, while Christian Bizot provided a major boost to the estate's marketing strategies.

Geographical location of Maison Bollinger

At Bollinger, great importance is attached to the natural, organic character of the vines. The soil is grassed and herbicides are avoided as much as possible. These efforts have earned Bollinger the "Haute Valeur Environnementale" certification. The 172 hectares of vines are planted with Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay. The soil is composed of Campanian chalk, chalk gravel, thick hard limestone, Belemnite chalk and Sparnacian clay, all in varying proportions. When it comes to winemaking, wood is of paramount importance. Indeed, the Bollinger family employs the champenoise vinification method. Thermo-regulated stainless steel vats are used. Depending on the ability of the musts to hold wood, under-wood vinification using oak barrels is employed for all or just a portion of the cuvées. Malolactic fermentation is used for white wine cuvées. The bottles are stirred by hand on a wooden rack, 1/8 to 1⁄4 of a turn. After aging on laths, the deposit is expelled by disgorging on the fly.